20 player steroid list

The Mitchell Report also stated that interviews were requested of five MLB players who had spoken out publicly on the steroid issue. Of these players, only one, Frank Thomas , was willing to be interviewed. The Mitchell Report stated that there was no evidence that any of these five had used performance-enhancing drugs. Curt Schilling , one of the four players who declined to interview with Mitchell, explained that he denied Mitchell's request because he "would have nothing to offer" Mitchell's investigation "other than personal opinion and hypotheticals." [6]

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Which made Canseco’s second benefactor — Mike Wallace — all the more important. John Hamlin, a producer at 60 Minutes , had gotten a tip about Canseco’s book from a friend at another network. (The friend couldn’t act on it because his employer was a Major League Baseball rights holder.) Hamlin began calling baseball people and confirming the details. Almost no one would talk on the record, but they suggested that Canseco’s account was true. One of the few allegations Hamlin couldn’t verify was Canseco’s insistence that Roger Clemens was juicing.

On February 15, 2004, the Rangers traded Rodriguez to the New York Yankees for second baseman Alfonso Soriano and a player to be named later ( Joaquín Árias was sent to the Rangers on March 24). The Rangers also agreed to pay $67 million of the $179 million left on Rodriguez's contract. Rodriguez agreed to switch positions from shortstop to third base, paving the way for the trade, because the popular Derek Jeter was already entrenched at shortstop. Rodriguez also had to switch uniform numbers, from 3 to 13; he had worn 3 his entire career, but that number is retired by the Yankees in honor of Babe Ruth . This was only the second time in MLB history that a reigning MVP was sold or traded, with the first coming in 1914 when Eddie Collins was sold to the Chicago White Sox from the Philadelphia Athletics . [51]

The Story: In February 2005 Canseco released his autobiography and steroid tell-all, Juiced , Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big. In it he described himself as 'the chemist' having experimented on himself for years. He claimed to have educated and personally injected many players including Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro, Juan Gonzalez, Ivan Rodriguez, and Jason Giambi. In his second book, Vindicated , Canseco added Magglio Ordonez to the list of players he had educated and injected with steroids. He also said he introduced Alex Rodriguez to a trainer/PED supplier after Rodriguez had asked where he could get steroids.

20 player steroid list

20 player steroid list

On February 15, 2004, the Rangers traded Rodriguez to the New York Yankees for second baseman Alfonso Soriano and a player to be named later ( Joaquín Árias was sent to the Rangers on March 24). The Rangers also agreed to pay $67 million of the $179 million left on Rodriguez's contract. Rodriguez agreed to switch positions from shortstop to third base, paving the way for the trade, because the popular Derek Jeter was already entrenched at shortstop. Rodriguez also had to switch uniform numbers, from 3 to 13; he had worn 3 his entire career, but that number is retired by the Yankees in honor of Babe Ruth . This was only the second time in MLB history that a reigning MVP was sold or traded, with the first coming in 1914 when Eddie Collins was sold to the Chicago White Sox from the Philadelphia Athletics . [51]

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