Corticosteroids used for asthma

Two review authors (HI and IS) independently assessed and selected the studies to be included in the review. The methodological quality of each trial was assessed by each review author using the criteria of the Cochrane Collaboration, focusing on concealment of allocation, blinding of the intervention, completeness of follow-up and blinding of the outcome assessors. Data was independently extracted by each review author. If disagreement arose on the suitability of a trial for inclusion in the review or its quality, a consensus was to be reached between all three review authors by discussion.

It is important to use the correct amount of topical steroid for your eczema, as instructed by your healthcare professional. Topical steroids should be applied with clean hands so that the skin just glistens. It can sometimes be difficult to judge how much steroid to use and there are guidelines on the amount required to cover body areas that are affected by eczema. These are based on the Finger Tip Unit (FTU), and explained in detail in our fact sheet which you can download as a pdf from the related documents to the right of this page.

Steve Roberts, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVO, of the Animal Eye Center in Loveland, Colo., describes this phenomenon: "The exacerbation effect of topical corticosteroids relates to suppression of the normal healing response and the inflammatory response to microbes, and its enhancement of the breakdown of proteins within the collagen of the cornea. Within a few hours of a break in the corneal epithelium (outer layer), white blood cells (neutrophils or PMNs--polymorphonuclear leukocytes) move into the tear film and gain access to the epithelium and underlying corneal connective tissue (stroma). As the PMNs try to stop infection, they begin to remodel the wound area in preparation of healing by epithelial cell migration to form a new layer. If the initial influx of PMNs is reduced by the presence of steroids, then microbes may gain a foothold, making ultimate control difficult even with antibiotics or antifungal medications."

Oral and injectable systemic corticosterois are steroid hormones prescribed to decrease inflammation in diseases and conditions such as arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, for example), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, asthma, bronchitis, some skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions that involve the nose and eyes. Examples of systemic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone (Cortef), cortisone, prednisone (Prednisone Intensol), prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone), and methylprednisolone (Medrol, Depo-Medrol, Solu-Medrol). Some of the side effects of systemic corticosteroids are swelling of the legs, hypertension, headache, easy bruising, facial hair growth, diabetes, cataracts, and puffiness of the face.

Corticosteroids used for asthma

corticosteroids used for asthma

Oral and injectable systemic corticosterois are steroid hormones prescribed to decrease inflammation in diseases and conditions such as arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, for example), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, asthma, bronchitis, some skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions that involve the nose and eyes. Examples of systemic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone (Cortef), cortisone, prednisone (Prednisone Intensol), prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone), and methylprednisolone (Medrol, Depo-Medrol, Solu-Medrol). Some of the side effects of systemic corticosteroids are swelling of the legs, hypertension, headache, easy bruising, facial hair growth, diabetes, cataracts, and puffiness of the face.

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