Steroid players in the hall of fame

When it comes to steroid use in football, particularly the NFL it’s important to remember this is a private sporting body; it is not government funded or a public entity, but a private business. Even so, due to the mass hysteria that has existed for more than twenty years, steroids in football have been deemed a necessary evil the . government must fight, but this raises an important question; why? It has been stated the prohibition of use is in place to protect the purity of the game and to keep the issue of influence under control. It has been stated that due to NFL players being role models for the public, especially the youth that steroid use in football must be prohibited. Are these justified reasons? What about many other controversial activities such men often partake in? What about many of the controversial activities many in the general public partake in? These are questions we can debate round and round, but the truth of the matter is simple; steroids in football are here to stay, and if you don’t like it, well, it’s time you find another sport.

Among the widely used steroids is Deca-Durabolin. For the past three decades, Deca Durabolin steroid has delivered great gains to people looking for muscle mass and has the ability to reduce joint pain and boost the body’s immune system. The most important benefit of Deca-Durabolin for both amateur athletes and bodybuilders is that it doesn’t have serious side effects since it doesn’t convert to estrogen like other compounds. As such, Deca-Durabolin does not have severe or higher degree side effects that other compounds might have.

Some of the approved drugs are synthetic versions of the natural hormones, such as trenbolone acetate and zeranol. Just like the natural hormone implants, before FDA approved these drugs, FDA required information and/or toxicological testing in laboratory animals to determine safe levels in the animal products that we eat (edible tissues). Furthermore, FDA required that the manufacturers demonstrate that the amount of hormone left in each edible tissue after treatment is below the appropriate safe level. As described above, a safe level is a level which would be expected to have no harmful effect in humans.

Now, thanks to a banned rugby player whose brave revelations may help to save his sport, we are seeing some light being shone on the reality that steroids are almost as much a part of rugby’s culture as tying your laces. And that isn’t just in Wales. The whistleblower, 20-year-old Daniel Spencer-Tonks , who was interviewed as part of a documentary this week on Welsh rugby, is actually a former England under-16 rugby union international who was playing rugby league for the University of Gloucestershire All Golds when he failed a drug test in February. He says steroid use is “hugely widespread” at all levels because of a pressure on players to be “bigger, faster and stronger”.

Steroids can have long-lasting and sometimes irreversible side effects on the body. Anabolic steroids have been linked to increased cholesterol, stroke and blood clots, urinary and bowel problems, and problems with the musculoskeletal system. Since steroids are a hormone, much like testosterone, the effects on sex characteristics can be far reaching, causing a kind of hyper-masculinity in young men. They can also cause male-pattern baldness and shrinking of the testicles. The excess of testosterone can also have feminizing effects on young men, such as breast development. (Jerry Adler, 2004)

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Steroid players in the hall of fame

steroid players in the hall of fame

Now, thanks to a banned rugby player whose brave revelations may help to save his sport, we are seeing some light being shone on the reality that steroids are almost as much a part of rugby’s culture as tying your laces. And that isn’t just in Wales. The whistleblower, 20-year-old Daniel Spencer-Tonks , who was interviewed as part of a documentary this week on Welsh rugby, is actually a former England under-16 rugby union international who was playing rugby league for the University of Gloucestershire All Golds when he failed a drug test in February. He says steroid use is “hugely widespread” at all levels because of a pressure on players to be “bigger, faster and stronger”.

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